How to schedule the GED test

The GED® test is one of the three available High School Equivalency (HSE) exams in America.

The test is entirely computer-based and includes four independent subtests or modules that cover the academic subject areas of Math (Mathematical Reasoning), Literacy (Reasoning through Language Arts), Social Studies, and Science.

You can take one or more of the four modules at a time; no need to complete the entire GED battery in one take.

GED test-takers cannot already hold a secondary education diploma or be enrolled in another education program.

The GED credential is equivalent to a common high school diploma and recognized as such by virtually all North American governmental agencies, employers, and universities and colleges.

To take the GED subtests, you must set up an account online with the portal MyGED on the website GED.com.

You may create your account anytime you like; there’s no need to wait until you’re ready to take (one of) the subtests.

You need to have a working email address and if you don’t, you can set that up on the website.

Having a major credit or debit card is also required but if that’s a problem, vouchers are available at major GED prep sites and testing centers.

When registering with GED.com, you’ll need to submit things like your name, address, former education, etc., but you won’t have to pay for your tests until you’re all set to make an appointment at a testing location near you. You can find all GED testing centers here.

You can take the GED test online or at a state-certified GED test center. Until recently, you were required to show up in person at one of your state’s official testing centers but this has now changed with the introduction of an online GED testing option.

Please don’t try to buy any GED documents over the internet as employers and schools can very easily check if your GED diploma is real. To learn all about which states are partaking in the online GED test-taking pilot, check out this post.

How to schedule and pay for the tests

When you’re properly prepared, go to the GED.com website and make an appointment for taking one or more of the four GED subtests. You can take the four modules individually and check here to read more about the GED subjects covered per test.

First, determine which of the four GED modules you want to take first. Then you can select the location that’s close to you and the date and time. If you’ll schedule two subtests at the same time, keep in mind that usually, you’ll only have a short 10-minute break in between the tests.

You can also schedule the tests separately on the same day at different times so you’ll have a longer break between the subtests.

If you’d like to take all the four subtests in one single day (if you can find a test center that can administer that), schedule the tests in such a way that it allows you to have a decent lunch break.

Then you’ll be asked to pay for your scheduled tests. Fees vary from state to state, but in general, each of the modules will set you back around $30 (or $120 for all four GED modules). You only have to pay for subtests that you schedule. So scheduling and paying are all done online at GED.com/MyGED. For the price in your state, check out this article.

GED Ready practice test

Before signing up for the real GED subtests, you may want to take the GED Ready® practice test. This is the official practice test, provided by GED Testing Service, which will tell you if you are “likely to pass” or that you need more preparation and in what subject fields. Read more here.

Most states don’t require test-takers to do this, but taking the GED Ready test will definitely help you to get optimally prepared for the real thing. For more information about the GED scoring system, click here.

The GED Ready test is half the length of the actual test and costs $6 per subject or $24 for the entire GED exam.

You can buy the GED Ready practice tests on your MyGED account. The GED exam is pretty challenging. The passing score is set at a level that forty percent of all high school graduated would not be able to attain a passing score on their first try. So be sure to get properly prepared for the test!

GED scoring

On each GED subtest, you’ll need to attain at least a score of 145 to pass. To learn more about all topics addressed in the GED exam, check out this post. Your test results scores are available within 24 hours or right after you took the tests at GED.com except for the essay part. After you’ve passed all four modules, you’ll receive the GED diploma.

When you’ve achieved very high scores, you’ll receive “College Ready” or “College Ready Plus College Credit” status. For GED test dates check out this page and keep also in mind that different states may have different rules and regulations regarding taking the GED exam and retaking the tests so get well informed!

Some students manage to get all set for passing the entire GED test in 1 or 2 months but most students will need some 3 to 8 months to get ready to take the GED exam successfully. The GED exam is fully computer-based so learning basic keyboarding and computer skills will also be helpful to become a successful GED test-taker!

Can I retake the GED if I passed?

Yes, you can retake a GED subtest when you failed that section, and you are allowed to retake a GED subject test even when you already passed that subtest.

This way, you have the opportunity to attain a better score. This website offers you numerous free GED practice tests in the four GED subject fields of Math, Science, Language Arts, and Social Studies.

Our free video lessons and practice tests are efficient tools to learn all about your weak and strong points so you can dedicate your time to those topics that require the most of your attention.

You won’t need to spend so much time on those fields that you already master. Just review those fields and get better scores on the four GED modules. You deserve it, don’t you?

 

Last Updated on November 17, 2020.

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