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Best TASC Prep Books

TASC Books for the 2017 test. Get one of these books and learn (just purchasing it will not help:-) and you will get ready for the TASC exam.

  • Kaplan TASC 2016-2017.
  • McGraw-Hill Education Preparation for the TASC Test 2nd Edition
  • TASC Practice Tests: 350 Test Prep Questions for the Test Assessing Secondary Completion
    by TASC Exam Practice Test Question Team

For people who never finished high school, it can be very rewarding to go for the TASC diploma because it will give you the opportunity to obtain suitable work (or a better job). The TASC diploma also allows you access to colleges and universities. Securing the TASC diploma will surely improve your life. And here you can read also about GED courses.

You are qualified to take the TASC exam if you never finished high school and if you are not enrolled in another school program. When you think the TASC path is something for you, keep these rules in mind to become successful in obtaining your own High School Equivalency diploma:

–   Find the TASC/GED testing site closest to you, and check examination dates. Find out as much as you can: deadline policy (there are states where you need to be registered at least two months prior to the test date. Communicate well with your local GED/TASC site and get best informed about the examination. Be sure you prepare as good as you can. You can find a lot of preparation material at the local library or bookstores, but you can find also numerous facilities (near you where (often free) TASC/GED prep classes are offered.
–   Get super prepared, sit for the examination and secure your High School Equivalency diploma, and please be respectful to the people who as volunteers do their best for you in preparation classes.

In January 2014, many states introduced the TASC (Test Assessing Secondary Completion) to replace the completely overhauled and now computer-formatted GED test. The TASC (just like GED and HiSET), assesses students’ readiness for work floor and college as outlined in the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), a series of standards describing to the point what students must know at the end of which grade level. Successful test takers of the TASC exam are awarded a diploma that is recognized and accepted as equivalent to a high school diploma by the vast majority of admissions officials of colleges and universities and businesses. The TASC (just like the 2002 series of the GED exam) examines five subject areas: Language Arts (reading- 75 minutes, writing- 105 minutes, Math- 105 minutes, Science- 85 minutes, and Social Studies- 75 minutes.