GED Test Dates

GED test dates are set by the individual testing centers. There are no fixed dates on the national level. Unlike, SAT, ACT and other tests, the GED® tests can be scheduled throughout the year.

Practically every week of the month, you can take the GED test in one of the certified GED testing centers near you.

All states and territories have their own local GED administrators who govern GED test-taking for their state or territory.

Once you’ve created your GED account, you can find all test dates at all official GED test centers. For the HiSET® and TASC™ exams, similar procedures apply.

How can you find out what dates are available?

To find out the available testing dates, you need to log in to your GED.com account. Click on the “Schedule Test” menu item. Then, follow the direction on your screen.

You will be asked to select a test location; generally, the system will show you several test locations based on your zip code. Then on the next page (“Find an appointment”), you’ll see a calendar.

Click on the tiny arrow in the calendar’s top right corner to switch to the next month. If particular dates are available, you can click on those days to make your appointment.

These days, because of the coronavirus outbreak, finding a testing center that is open might be challenging. Many GED, HiSET, and TASC testing centers are closed because of COVID-19 and you should consult with the organizations and testing centers when testing will be available again. Read more here. 

Where to schedule the GED test

Students can schedule their GED (General Education Development) test year-round at numerous testing centers in the U.S. and Canada, and there are also quite a few international locations.

GED testing must be done in person. The exam is not offered online and this also counts for the HiSET and TASC.

The cost of GED testing varies by state but in general, the GED exam will set you back around $120 for the entire exam. A number of states offer GED testing for free or at reduced rates.

Best practicing of choosing the GED test date

If you’ve created your account on GED.com/MyGED, you can schedule your tests. You can choose where you want to take your tests and you’ll be shown available testing dates at your chosen test center. Everything is conveniently done online.

Can you get a GED in one day? Yes, it’s possible to take all the tests in one day (if you can find a testing site that can handle that), but it’s not recommended.

To choose a GED test date, you can simply log into your MyGED account and select a testing site near you and a day and time that suit your agenda. To set up your account, you must have a current email address.

The GED exam comprises of four modules (independent subtests) that can be taken one at a time. After setting up your account on the website GED.com, you can schedule and pay for your test(s).

The four GED modules and entirely computer-delivered and cover the academic subject areas of mathematics, social studies, science, and language arts (reading and writing combined). The TASC and HiSET exams are generally offered in both computerized and paper-based formats.

Most of the questions on the GED exam are still multiple-choice though the latest version includes more essay-style answers that earlier editions. Testing takes place at a level comparable to that of high school seniors.

Local administrators manage the testing processes at GED test centers and each GED test center determines the dates on which the GED test, or one of the four subtests, will be given.

There are test centers that offer regularly scheduled testing dates like two days a week, one weekend each month, while at other GED testing centers, you can schedule your tests at your convenience. To learn about how to set up your account on GED.com/MyGED, click here.

GED math prep

To be successful on the GED exam, getting optimally prepared is crucial. Online online video lessons are highly effective and this website’s free practice tests will also help you to get ready for the real GED test fast! Most GED applicants find the GED Math test the most challenging of the four modules so use this website’s free help to ready.

There are more than 3,500 GED test centers throughout the world and there certainly is one in your region. This website lists all GED test centers in the U.S. and U.S. Territories. You can find all the testing sites on this page.

Before setting up your account and registering for the GED exam, make sure you meet your state’s eligibility requirements. These may vary slightly by state but, in general, you qualify for the GED exam if you meet these requirements:

  • In most states, you must be at least 16 years of age (check here for your state)
  • You don’t hold a high school diploma or equivalent
  • You are not attending another education program
  • You meet all other requirements of your state or territory regarding residency, how long you’ve been out of school, having attended a prep course, having passed the GED Ready® practice test or similar, and so on.

The GED exam is available in multiple languages. Currently, the exam is offered in English and Spanish and at some locations, in French as well. Not all testing centers offer Spanish GED testing, though, so get well-informed.

The GED exam is also available to test-takers with hearing or vision impairments and special accommodations can be made for students suffering from conditions such as emotional or mental health conditions, ADHD, chronic health disabilities, or some other condition that may impact their ability to take the exam under normal conditions.

Students who need testing accommodations can request so in a timely manner prior to scheduling their tests on the website GED.com or at their local testing site.

In conclusion: all U.S. GED test jurisdictions offer the GED exam periodically all through the year. If you want accurate and current information about GED testing dates, please get in touch with your state’s GED Office or contact your local testing center.

Furthermore, all relevant information is available on the website GED.com. This is the official GED website where also more important information is available about the GED exam itself, GED test preparation, what the scores mean, developments on the job market, career advice, school information, and so on.

Before planning your tests, it may be wise to contact your local GED testing center to check out operating hours and to get informed about possible additional testing locations that may be closer to where you’re at.

Keep in mind that the GED exam is not attempting to measure all you know or all the things you can do. Instead, the exam compares your knowledge and skills to that of recent high school graduates.

 

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