The U.S. and Illinois Constitution Test

Some states (Illinois and Arizona) require GED® test-takers to additionally take and pass the United States and state constitutions test and in North Dakota and Wisconsin, GED hopefuls must additionally pass a Civics Exam.

To be successful on the GED Constitution test, test-takers must command the primary documents that are covered by the test and also be able to indicate the functions and roles of various elected officials.

The Constitution Test

This website offers numerous free online GED video lessons (including transcripts) and lots of free GED practice tests. Video lessons are known to be highly effective and will get you all set for the real thing fast and efficiently.

Part one of the Constitution Test addresses the Declaration of Independence, Declaring Independence, and Excerpts from the Declaration of Independence. Take  a practice test now:

1. The Preamble of the Constitution

"We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common Defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America."

In the Preamble of the US Constitution, there is the phrase "insure domestic tranquility." What does that mean?

A.
B.
C.
D.

Question 1 of 10

2. The following is found in Federalist 51, which was written in 1788 by James Madison. What is the constitutional principle that Madison describes in this passage?

“… the interior structure of the government as that its several constituent parts may, by their mutual relations, be the means of keeping each other in their proper places. ”

 

A.
B.
C.
D.

Question 2 of 10

3. What do we call a government run by the people (either indirectly or directly)?

A.
B.
C.
D.

Question 3 of 10

4.

The 14th Amendment

Section 1.

"All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws."

What term is used in the Fourteenth Amendment for the description of individuals born in the U.S. or were naturalized?

A.
B.
C.
D.

Question 4 of 10

5. Look at this graph and answer the question below.

Of the statements below, which can be inferred from the graph?

A.
B.
C.
D.

Question 5 of 10

6. The Bill of Rights consists of the first ten amendments to the U.S. Constitution. It protects the way of life of Americans. Which of the following situations is NOT a right protected by this Bill of Rights?

A.
B.
C.
D.

Question 6 of 10

7. When Congress has passed new tax laws, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) enforces that.

This shows a clear example of ...

A.
B.
C.
D.

Question 7 of 10

8. Steve's prosecution led to a conviction in state court for speaking out in public against the governor. During this trial, Steve was denied a lawyer's counsel. Three years later, the United States Supreme Court overturned Steve's conviction, stating the state had violated (or not guaranteed) Steve's constitutional rights. Which amendments are applying to this case?

A.
B.
C.
D.

Question 8 of 10

9. This table is showing lobbying methods, the associated costs, and the minimum time required.

You feel like wanting to support your district’s man or woman in Congress and want to lobby indirectly. You don't have much money, though, and you can only help in the coming month. What are your best options?

A.
B.
C.
D.

Question 9 of 10

10. The following are views pro and con the increase of American minimum wage. What is the conclusion that we can draw from these views?

 

A.
B.
C.
D.

Question 10 of 10


 

Students must know the two main topics covered in the American Declaration of Independence; what the theory is of American government; the date on which the Declaration of Independence became effective; and who was the main author of the Declaration of Independence.

Part two covers the U.S. Constitution and its Outline; How and when the Constitution was written; The Federal System and the Separation of Powers; Article I: The Legislative Branch and How a Bill Becomes a Law; Article II: The Executive Branch; Article III: The Judicial Branch; Checks and Balances; Articles IV-VII; The Amendments.

Part three of the Illinois Constitution Test covers the U.S. Flag and Displaying the Flag.

Part Four of the test deals with Articles I-III of The Illinois Constitution, Article IV (The State Legislative Branch); Article V (The State Executive Branch); Article VI (The State Judicial Branch); and Articles VII–XIV. For all GED prep locations in Illinois, go to this page.

The U.S. Constitution

The U.S. Constitution has three parts. The first part is a 1-sentence introduction referred to as the Preamble. This Preamble doesn’t contain any laws but it restates Thomas Jefferson’s main idea for the U’S’ Declaration of Independence.

The Preamble is emphasizing that the power of governing and government is derived from the American people. The government, rather than being the master of the people, is to be the servant of the people.

The 2nd part of the U.S. Constitution contains 7 separate articles that all give the plan for a specific part of the government:
Article I covers The Legislative Branch that is responsible for making laws
Article II covers The Executive Branch that is responsible for enforcing the laws
Article III covers The Judicial Branch that is responsible for interpreting the laws
Article IV is about the Relations Among the U.S. States
Article V addresses Amending the U.S. Constitution
Article VI covers the Supreme Law of the Land
Article VII addresses Ratification or Approval

The 3rd part of the U.S. Constitution contains the amendments. After the Constitution had become law, the first Congress meeting added 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution. We know these 10 amendments as The Bill of Rights.

This Bill of Rights became effective on December 15th, 1791, and the amendments are guaranteeing personal freedoms to all Americans. Since the Bill of Rights was added, 17 more amendments were added to the U.S. Constitution.

The U.S. and Illinois State Constitution and Flag Test

Let’s consider the situation in Illinois. To earn your High School Equivalency Diploma in Illinois, on top of completing one of the available HSE (high school equivalency) exams (GED®, HiSET®, or TASC™), you also have to take and pass the U.S. and Illinois Constitution Test. For information on the newly introduced online GED testing option or the new online HiSET exam, click on the links.

The U.S. and Illinois Constitution Test is officially called the United States and Illinois State Constitution and Flag Test. The test assesses to what extent Illinois residents can answer questions related to American patriotism and the principles and organization of representative government.

This test is free and may be taken at any time. The test covers your knowledge in subject fields related to the United States Constitution, the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. flag, and the state of Illinois Constitution.

If you prepare, you’ll be able to take the Constitution Test successfully just like you will have to get optimally prepared to attain sufficient scores on the four independent GED subtests. Instruction is generally offered by ABE (Adult Basic Education) facilities, adult schools, and community colleges.

GED students that already passed this high school level Constitution Test do not have to sit for it again. Just provide proof that you took and passed it to your Regional Office of Education at the time you’re requesting your HSE (High School Equivalency) Diploma.

High School Civics Test

Before students can graduate from their public high schools, many states require students to take and pass a Civics Test. Not all of these states have the same requirements for GED test-takers though! Usually, this Civics Test is identical to the American (USCIS) Naturalization Exam.

The following fifteen states require high school students to pass a Civics Test in order to graduate: Arizona, Florida, Idaho, Kansas, Louisiana, Minnesota, Missouri, New Hampshire, North Dakota, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Virginia, and Wisconsin.

 

Last Updated on

You Can Pass Your GED Test Easily.
Full GED Prep with Progress Tracking. Get Covcel and Pass your GED Test.
Check our review of Covcel.

Check also