GED Age Requirements By State

States can impose their own GED testing fees and qualification requirements. This page shows you the GED age requirements per state.

Required additional documentation shows just some of the prerequisites. Please check your state’s posts on our website for a full report.

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Applicants must register at GED.com and create an account with the portal MyGED.

There are four GED® subtests (modules) that can be taken separately. You have the option to take the tests one or more at a time.

Not all states use the GED exam for high school equivalency testing. There are three HSE (high school equivalency) tests available: GED, TASC, and HiSET.

The four GED (General Education Development) tests contain questions in the academic fields of Language Arts (Reading and Writing), Math, Science, and Social Studies.

Some opted for the HiSET® (High School Equivalency Test), others for the TASC™ exam (Test Assessing Secondary Completion), and a number of states offer multiple options.

The HiSET and TASC exams are available (in most states) both on paper and on a computer whereas the GED is entirely computerized.


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Only in New Jersey, all three available tests must be taken in a computer-based format.

The TASC and HiSET come with five subtests as the Language Arts portion has individual writing and reading subtests.

Help and support are available on this website through free practice tests and video lessons. Your test score and other data can be seen immediately after testing.

The GED test was only available in a computer-based format at state- and Pearson VUE-approved testing centers but recently, an online option was introduced as well. A GED graduate has shown proficiency and knowledge to successfully follow any credit-bearing course at the university or college level and to be successful in the employment market.

GED required additional documentation

In general, proof of withdrawal from school, official permission from a parent or guardian, and the applicant’s school district is required. Please check with a test site near you for their or your state’s specific policies. Twitter and Facebook may also offer lots of GED-related information.

Young test takers may also be eligible if they can present a court order, or an official request by an employer, a college official, or a military recruiter.

The High School Equivalency Diploma will for sure result in better professional options and qualifies the holder for a great college education.

GED in Alabama

  • The Alabama Community College System is responsible for the GED exam in Alabama.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18 but 16 and 17-year-olds may also qualify under strict additional requirements.
  • Required additional documentation for 16/17 year-olds: Proof of withdrawal from high school, official permission from a parent or guardian, and more.

Rules and regulations change frequently. If you’re looking for additional information, please contact the Alabama Community College System at www.accs.edu

GED in Alaska

  • In Alaska, the Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development, through the Alaska Job Center Network, is responsible for the GED exam.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • Required additional documentation for 16 and 17-year olds: Proof of school withdrawal and written permission from parent or guardian, and more.

For additional information, or if you have questions about new regulations, please contact the Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development at www.labor.alaska.gov

GED in Arizona

  • The Arizona Department of Education Arizona (Adult Education Services) is responsible for the GED exam in Arizona.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • Required additional documentation for 16 and 17-year olds: Applicants must be officially withdrawn from the last school they attended and present a notarized and dated approval letter from a parent or guardian. In Arizona, test-takers must also take and pass a Constitution Test. Keep in mind that when you leave high school prematurely, you do so in line with legal requirements.

If you have additional questions, or when you are looking for new regulations, please get in touch with the Arizona Department of Education at www.azed.gov

GED in Arkansas

  • The Arkansas Department of Career Education (Adult Education) is responsible for GED testing in Arkansas.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • Required additional documentation for 16 and 17-year-olds: They must prove official withdrawal from their last school and hold parental approval (or by a guardian).

If you have additional questions or are looking for new requirements or regulations, please get in touch with the Arkansas Department of Education at www.arcareereducation.org/about/adult-education

GED in California

  • The California Department of Education is responsible for High School Equivalency testing in California.
  • The state has approved two high school equivalency tests (GED, and HiSET).
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18 (or within 60 days of your 18th birthday)
  • 17-year-olds must be officially out of high school for no less than 60 days. They must present a written request from a prospective employer, the military, or a post-secondary educational institution.
  • 17-year-old students who pass the GED test will not receive their California High School Equivalency Certificate until they will be 18 years old. If needed, they can receive a letter of intent that proves that the state holds their certificate pending their 18th birthday. California residents may also take the state’s CHSPE exam to demonstrate proficiency.

If you want more information or if you have questions about requirements or new regulations, please contact the California Department of Education at www.cde.ca.gov

GED in Colorado

  • The Colorado Department of Education is responsible for the state’s HSE (high school equivalency) testing program.
  • Colorado also approved two HSE tests (HiSET and GED).
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 17
  • Required additional documentation for 16-year-olds (among others): They must have been officially withdrawn from school and present written permission by a parent or guardian.

For additional information or if you have questions about new regulations, please get in touch with the Colorado Department of Education at www.cde.state.co.us

GED in Connecticut

  • The Connecticut State Department of Education is responsible for GED testing in Connecticut.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 19
  • Required additional documentation for 17 and 18-year-olds:
  • Applicants 17 and 18 years of age must be officially withdrawn from school for no less than months and hold permission by parent or guardian.
  • In Connecticut, GED testing is free for state residents under the age of 21 and veterans. All others pay a $13 registration fee which includes the cost of the GED diploma.

For more information or if you want to learn about new regulations, please contact the Connecticut State Department of Education at www.portal.ct.gov/Services/Education/Adult-Education/GED-Testing-Information

GED in Delaware

  • In Delaware, the state’s Department of Education is responsible for GED testing.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • Applicants 16 or 17 years of age may also qualify but they must have a waiver issued by the Delaware Department of Education.
  • They must be Delaware residents, officially withdrawn from high school, and be 16 years old at the time they apply for an age waiver.

If you want additional information or when you have questions about more requirements new regulations, please contact the Delaware Department of Education at www.doe.k12.de.us

GED in the District of Columbia

  • The Washington D.C. Office of the State Superintendent of Education is responsible for high school equivalency (GED) testing in the District of Columbia.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • Applicants 16 and 17 years of age may also take the GED exam if they have written permission from a parent or a legal guardian and have been officially out of school for at least six months.
  • There are more requirements and young applicants who are in an out-of-home placement program of the juvenile justice system or who are incarcerated may also be eligible for under-age GED testing if they are enrolled in a federal law GED program.

For more information, or when you have questions about new regulations, contact the Washington D.C. State Board of Education at www.sboe.dc.gov

GED in Florida

  • In Florida, the Florida Department of Education (DOE) is responsible for GED testing in Florida.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • Required additional documentation: 16 and 17 years old must have approval from their school districts before they can schedule test appointments. They must hold an age waiver as well as written parental consent.

Rules and regulations change often. Therefore, when in doubt, get in touch with the Florida Department of Education at www.fldoe.org

GED in Georgia

  • The Technical College System of Georgia is responsible for GED testing in Georgia. Georgia is using the GED and HiSET exams.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • 16 and 17-year-olds must be officially withdrawn from high school, they are required to sign up for a state-approved adult education program, and have parental consent to be able to take the GED or HiSET tests. Local Adult Education Centers can provide more information. More information about how to get an age waiver and what it is can be found here.

If you want to learn about new regulations or need additional information, contact the Georgia Department of Education at www.www.gadoe.org

GED in Hawaii

  • The Hawaii State Department of Education (DOE) is responsible for GED or HiSET testing in Hawaii
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • Applicants 16 and 17 years old are required to be officially withdrawn from their high school and must have permission from a parent or guardian to be able to take the GED or HiSET high school equivalency exam.

If you would like to get more information, or if you have any questions about regulations and requirements, contact the Hawaii State Department of Education at www.hawaiipublicschools.org

GED in Idaho

  • In Idaho, the state’s Division of Career and Technical Education is responsible for GED testing.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • Applicants who are 16 or 17 years of age may also qualify if they are officially withdrawn from their high school program, have parental consent, and have applied for and received a GED Age Waiver. If you’re interested to benefit from this website’s free online GED Reading practice tests, go to this page.

For additional information, or in case you have any questions on requirements and/or regulations, please contact the Idaho Department of Education at www.sde.idaho.gov

GED in Illinois

  • The Illinois Community College Board (Adult Education & Literacy) is responsible for GED and HiSET testing in Illinois.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • 17 year-olds must hold an official withdrawal letter from their last school and present a letter of consent from a parent or guardian.
  • Applicants must also pass the Constitution Test to earn their High School Equivalency Certificate. Illinois uses two options, the HiSET and GED exams.

Regulations change often. So if you need additional information, or if you want to learn more about requirements in Illinois, please contact the Illinois State Board of Education at www.isbe.net

GED in Indiana

  • The Indiana Department of Workforce Development is responsible for HSE (high school equivalency) testing, in Indiana: HiSET (short for High School Equivalency Test).
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18 and applicants must be Indiana residents.
  • 16 and 17-year-olds may also take the test if they have an exit interview form from the last school they attended as well as a letter of recommendation from their school and parental consent.

Regulations and rules change often. If you want more information or learn about requirements in Indiana, please contact the Indiana Department of Workforce Development at www.in.gov/dwd

GED in Iowa

  • The Iowa Department of Education is responsible for high school equivalency testing in the state. Iowa uses the HiSET exam.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 17
  • 16-year-olds may also apply if they hold an official withdrawal form from their last school and parental consent.
  • Students must sign up for an Adult Education and Literacy program, complete the pre-CASAS Assessment (Math & Reading), and pass the Official Practice Test (OPT).

Regulations change frequently. For additional information or if you want to learn more about new requirements in Iowa, contact the Iowa Department of Education at www.educateiowa.gov

GED in Kansas

  • The Kansas Board of Regents is responsible for GED testing in the state and issues the Kansas State High School Diploma upon successful completion of the four GED subtests.
    Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • Sixteen and seventeen-year-olds may also qualify, but they present a Compulsory School Attendance or a Compulsory Attendance Exemption Form signed by a parent or a legal guardian.
  • These forms need to be from the school district in which the applicant resides.

For more information or if you want to read more about new rules and requirements in Kansas, please contact the Kansas Board of Regents at www.kansasregents.org

GED in Kentucky

  • In Kentucky, the Council on Postsecondary Education/Commonwealth of Kentucky is responsible for GED testing in the state.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 19
  • Applicants aged 17 or 18 must be officially withdrawn from school for at least 90 days (certified by their school district) and hold parental consent to qualify for scheduling their tests (more restrictions apply so get well-informed).

Regulations and rules change often. So when you wish to learn more bout the latest developments, please get in touch with the Kentucky Department of Education at www.education.ky.gov

GED in Louisiana

  • The Louisiana Department of Education is responsible for the state’s high school equivalency testing (HiSET in Louisiana).
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • 16 and 17-year-olds must enroll in a state-approved adult education program and hold an approved age waiver signed by the local superintendent and have official parental consent.

To learn more about the latest developments, or if you want to get more information, please get in touch with the Louisiana Department of Education at www.louisianabelieves.com

GED in Maine

  • The Maine Department of Education (DOE) is responsible for the state’s HSE (high school equivalency) program. Maine uses the HiSET exam for this program.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • You may qualify to take the HiSET exam at age 17 if you can prove that you have been out of school for at least one year, are homeschooled, or hold a state-approved “Immediate Need” waiver.
  • Sixteen-year-olds cannot take the high school equivalency test in Maine.

Regulations change frequently. For the latest developments or if you want more information, get in touch with the Maine Department of Education at www.maine.gov/doe

GED in Maryland

  • In Maryland, the Department of Labor (Licensing & Regulation) is responsible for   GED testing.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • You must be a resident of Maryland Maryland subsidizes GED testing for state residents. Candidates under the age of 19 years need to be officially withdrawn from their high school program.
  • 16 and 17-year-olds may also be eligible if they additionally provide approval from the school district and from a parent or guardian. They must also meet some further criteria.

If you need more information or want to learn more about requirements and regulations, please contact the Maryland Department of Labor at www.dllr.state.md.us

GED in Massachusetts

  • The Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (High School Equivalency Office) is responsible for high school equivalency testing.
  • Massachusetts uses two alternatives for this purpose, the HiSET, and the GED.
  • Minimum Age for GED or HiSET Testing – 18
  • 16 or 17-year-olds may also qualify if they present an official Letter of Withdrawal from the last school they attended that was approved by the Massachusetts High School Equivalency Office. This document must include the last date of school attendance and date of withdrawal, and be issued and signed by the school’s Principal/Headmaster/Head of Guidance.

Regulations and rules change frequently. If you want additional information or learn about new requirements, please contact the Massachusetts Department of Education at www.doe.mass.edu/hse

GED in Michigan

  • The Michigan Workforce Development Agency (Division of Education and Career Success) is responsible for the state’s GED and HiSET testing program.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • The applicant’s former high school class must have graduated in order to receive a GED diploma.
  • Applicants 16 and 17 years old may also take the GED or HiSET tests if they are Michigan Department of Military and Veterans Affairs graduates or completed the state’s National Guard Youth Challenge Program.

Regulations change often. To learn more about the latest developments or if you want more information, contact the Michigan Department of Education at www.michigan.gov/mde

GED in Minnesota

  • The Minnesota Department of Education is responsible for GED testing in the state.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 19
  • Applicants 17 and 18 years of age may also qualify for GED testing if they have been withdrawn from high school for no less than one year and meet some other requirements.

Regulations change often. So if you want to learn more about new developments or just want additional information, please contact the Minnesota Department of Education at www.education.mn.gov

GED in Mississippi

  • In Mississippi, the State Department of Education is responsible for GED and HiSET testing.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • 16 and 17-year-old applicants may also qualify if they are a year behind their 9th-grade cohort and if the school’s superintendent determines that they are eligible to take the GED or HiSET tests.

For more information, or if you would like to learn more about regulations and/or requirements, contact the Mississippi State Department of Education at www.mdek12.org

GED in Missouri

  • in Missouri, the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education is responsible for high school equivalency testing in the state.
  • Missouri uses the HiSET exam for this purpose. Test takers must be residents of Missouri and not be enrolled in any school program.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 17
  • Applicants who are 16 years old may also qualify if they provide sufficient credits toward high school graduation in addition to written permission from their last school’s superintendent or principal of the school last attended.
  • Sixteen-year-old homeschoolers may also be eligible and must provide parental or guardian approval.

Regulations and rules change often. If you would like to learn more about new regulations and/or developments, or if you need additional information, contact the Missouri Department of Elementary & Secondary Education at www.dese.mo.gov

GED in Montana

  • The Montana Office of Public Instruction is responsible for the state’s high school equivalency program. Montana uses the HiSET exam for this purpose.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 19
  • Younger applicants (16, 17, or 18 years old) may also qualify if they meet the state’s criteria and proved an Age Waiver.
  • Applicants need to be residents of Montana and also provide proof that they live in Montana.

If you have more questions about HiSET testing in Montana, or if you want additional information, please contact the Montana Office of Public Instruction at www.mt.gov/education

GED in Nebraska

  • The Nebraska Department of Education is responsible for the state’s GED testing program.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • Nebraska residents ages 16 and 17 may also be eligible for GED testing if they provide a handwritten letter that states the circumstances of withdrawal from their regular high school program and why they want to take the GED test. They must have been withdrawn from school for at least 30 days and meet more criteria.

When you have questions about changing regulations in Nebraska, or when you want more information, get in touch with the Nebraska Department of Education at www.education.ne.gov

GED in Nevada

  • The Nevada Department of Education (Division Adult Education) is responsible for high school equivalency testing in Nevada.
  • Nevada offers two options for this purpose, the GED and HiSET exams. Test takers must be Nevada residents.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • 16-17-year old may also qualify under certain conditions. They are required to have permission to withdraw from their school district and signed parental permission.
  • Younger test takers may also have to pass a practice test.

Regulations and rules change often. If you want more information, or when you want to learn more about rules and requirements in Nevada, contact the state’s Department of Education at www.doe.nv.gov

GED in New Hampshire

  • In New Hampshire, the Department of Education (Bureau of Adult Education) is responsible for high school equivalency testing (in New Hampshire: the HiSET exam).
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • Applicants 16 or 17 years old may take the HiSET exam if they passed the Official HiSET Practice Test. They also must provide permission from their school district and a parent or guardian.

Rules and regulations change often. So if you want to learn all about the latest developments, or if you need more information, please get in touch with New Hampshire’s Department of Education at www.education.nh.gov/adulted

GED in New Jersey

  • The New Jersey Department of Education is responsible for high school equivalency testing in the state.
  • New Jersey offers all three nationally available options, the GED, TASC, and HiSET exams.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • 16 and 17-year-old test takers must prove that they are not enrolled in a school program and present permission from a parent or legal guardian.
  • Test takers must be New Jersey residents. Paper-based testing is NOT possible in New Jersey.

For more information, or to learn all about new requirements and/or new rules, contact New Jersey’s State Department of Education at www.nj.gov/education

GED in New Mexico

  • The New Mexico Public Education Department is responsible for the state’s high school equivalency program.
  • The state offers two options, the HiSET exam and the GED test.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • Applicants ages 16 and 17 can also take the GED or HiSET exam if they have a permission form from their school district as well as consent from a parent or legal guardian.

State regulations might change. For additional information, or to learn more about new requirements, please contact New Mexico’s Department of Public Education at www.ped.state.nm.us

GED in New York State

  • In New York State, the New York State Education Department (Adult Career & Continuing Education Services) is responsible for high school equivalency testing.
  • New York State uses the TASC exam for this purpose.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 19
  • Students 16, 17, or 18 years old may also qualify if they meet extra requirements. New York is one of four states that use the TASC exam for high school equivalency testing.

Regulations and rules change frequently. If you want additional information or want to learn all about new requirements and regulations in New York State, contact the New York State Education Department at www.acces.nysed.gov

GED in North CarolinaGED requirements in 50 states

  • In North Carolina, high school equivalency testing is administered by the North Carolina State Board of Community Colleges.
  • The state offers two exams for this purpose, GED and HiSET. Note that not all options may be available at the state’s community colleges.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • Students ages 16 and 17 years may be eligible, though, if they meet certain requirements. They should contact their local community college’s Basic Skills Director to get permission for taking the high school equivalency exam.

For more information, or if you want to read more about new regulations in North Carolina, please contact North Carolina’s State Board of Community Colleges here: www.nccommunitycolleges.edu/state-board-community-colleges

GED in North Dakota

  • The North Dakota Department of Public Instruction is responsible for GED testing.
  • GED instruction is available at the Adult Learning Centers and satellite locations across North Dakota and also online at this website.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 16
  • Students who take part in GED prep classes at a North Dakota Adult Learning Center (or satellite location) before testing may qualify to have the testing fee of the first and last test paid (if passed) by the Bank of North Dakota.
  • Applicants must also pass a Civics exam.

State regulations change frequently. If you want more information, or if you want to learn more about ever-changing rules and requirements, please contact North Dakota’s Department of Public Instruction here: www.nd.gov/dpi

GED in Ohio

  • The Ohio State Department of Education (Ohio High School Equivalence Office) is responsible for high school equivalency (GED or HiSET) testing in the state.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • 16, 17, and 18-year-olds may take the GED or HiSET tests if they are officially withdrawn from their high school without a diploma, and those applicants ages 16 and 17 must also provide a consent form signed by a parent, legal guardian, or court official.

State rules and regulations change often. For more information, or to read about new rules and/or requirements, contact Ohio’s State Department of Education at www.education.ohio.gov/Topics/Testing/Ohio-Options-for-Adult-Diploma

GED in Oklahoma

  • The Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education (ODCTE – Adult Education Basic Division) is responsible for HSE (high school equivalency) testing in Oklahoma. Oklahoma offers two options, the HiSET and GED exams.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • Applicants 16 or 17 years of age may also qualify to take the HSE test if they have permission from their school district, a parent or legal guardian, and a school administrator.

State requirements and rules may change. To learn about new developments, or if you want more information, please check out the website of the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education at www.sde.ok.gov

GED in Oregon

  • In Oregon, the Higher Education Coordinating Commission (HECC) – Office of Community Colleges and Workforce Development (CCWD) – is responsible for the state’s GED testing program.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • Applicants 16 and 17 years old may also qualify if they are officially withdrawn from high school, hold permission from their school district, are married, or legally emancipated.
  • Younger applicants may also qualify if they are enrolled in an Oregon Option Program for In-School Youth.

The GED is a state-specific exam and regulations might change slightly. If you have any questions about regulations in Oregon, or if you need more information, please check with the Oregon Higher Education Coordinating Commission at www.oregon.gov/highered/Pages/index.aspx

GED in Pennsylvania

  • Pennsylvania’s State Department of Education is responsible for the state’s high school equivalency testing program.
  • Pennsylvania offers two options for this purpose, the GED and HiSET exams. Successful test-takers will receive the Commonwealth Secondary School Diploma (CSSD).
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • 16 or 17-year-olds who are officially withdrawn from secondary school may also qualify if they have completed an Age Waiver form, hold an official letter from an employer stating the applicant must pass the GED or HiSET exam for employment purposes.
  • A letter from a post-secondary educational institution or a branch of the Armed Services requesting permission will also do, just like an official request from a state institution in which the applicant is a resident, patient, or inmate.
  • Test takers will not receive their Commonwealth Secondary School Diploma before they turn 18. Until then they will be issued a transcript.

The GED and HiSET are state-specific exams and regulations and rules might change slightly. For more information, or if you have questions about rules and regulations in Pennsylvania, with the Pennsylvania Department of Education at www.education.pa.gov

GED in Rhode Island

  • Rhode Island’s Department of Education is responsible for high school equivalency testing. The High School Equivalency Diploma (GED) is administered by testing centers authorized by Rhode Island’s Board of Education.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • Rhode Island residents ages 16 or 17 can also take the GED tests if they are officially withdrawn from school or provide an official Alternative Learning Plan. There are also Rhode Island school districts that provide a high school diploma to test takers who successfully complete the National External Diploma Program (NEDP).

Rules and regulations for GED testing may change slightly. To learn about new developments or for more information about GED testing in Rhode Island, check out Rhode Island’s Department of Education at www.ride.ri.gov

GED in South Carolina

  • South Carolina’s Department of Education (Office of Adult Education/GED) is responsible for the state’s high school equivalency program. South Carolina uses the GED exam for HSE (High S School Equivalency) testing.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 19
  • Applicants 17 or 18 years of age may be eligible for testing if they hold a South Carolina “Verification of School Withdrawal” form signed by an official from the school they last attended.
  • 16-year-olds may qualify if they are under the jurisdiction of DJJ.

If you would like to have more information, or if you have questions about regulations, requirements, and rules in South Carolina, please contact the state’s Department of Education at www.ed.sc.gov

GED in South Dakota

  • The South Dakota Department of Labor and Regulation is responsible for sta state’s high school equivalency (GED) testing program. Age Requirements By State
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • 16 and 17-year-old applicants may also take the GED test if a school administrator states that the applicant has credit deficiency;
  • if they are authorized by a court officer; if there is a court order requiring GED testing;
  • if the applicant is under the direction of the state’s Department of Corrections;
  • or if the applicant is enrolled in a Job Corps Program.

Rules, regulations, and requirements may change slightly over time. For additional information or to learn about new developments in South Dakota, contact the state’s Department of Education at www.doe.sd.gov

GED in Tennessee

  • Tennessee’s Department of Labor and Workforce Development is responsible for the state’s high school equivalency testing program.
  • Tennessee is using the HiSET exam for this purpose.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • 17-year-olds may also qualify if they have an age waiver form signed by the Director of Schools and if they partake in a state-approved HiSET Option Program. Sixteen-year-olds cannot take the HiSET in Tennessee.
  • There is no state residency requirement in Tennessee.

The HiSET, like the GED, is a state exam and rules and regulations may change slightly. So if you have any questions about new regulations or developments in Tennessee, or if you want more information, contact the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development at www.tn.gov/workforce

GED in Texas

  • The Texas Education Agency (TEA) is responsible for the state’s high school equivalency testing program.
  • Texas offers the GED exam. Successful test-takers will receive the Texas Certificate of High School Equivalency (TxCHSE). Applicants must be residents of Texas.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • 17-year-olds may qualify if they are officially withdrawn from school and have permission from a parent or guardian.
  • 16-year-olds may qualify if they are under the direction of a state agency or a Family Code court order, or if they partake in a Texas Job Corps program or the Texas Challenge Academy.

For additional information, or to learn about current requirements, rules, and regulations regarding HiSET or GED testing in Texas, contact the state’s Education Agency at tea.texas.gov

GED in Utah

  • Utah’s State Board of Education is responsible for the state’s high school equivalency (GED) program.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • Younger applicants (16 or 17 years of age) may also qualify if they provide an official letter from the school they last attended or from their school district that states that the applicant is formally withdrawn from a K-12 education program.
  • They must additionally provide a signed permission letter from a parent or legal guardian (note that a marriage certificate can also be used for this purpose).

The GED exam is state-specific and requirements, rules, and regulations may change over time. So if you have questions about new rules or regulations, or if you need more information, contact Utah’s State Board of Education at www.schools.utah.gov

GED in Vermont

  • Vermont’s Agency of Education is responsible for the state’s high school equivalency testing. Vermont Adult Learning (VAL) offers prep facilities all through the state.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • 16 and 17-year-old applicants may also be eligible to take the GED tests if they hold written permission from a parent or a legal guardian. In Vermont, there are no further restrictions for these younger test-takers.

For more information or to learn all about current rules, regulations, and requirements regarding GED testing in Vermont, go to www.education.vermont.gov

GED in Virginia

  • Virginia’s Department of Education (VDOE – HSE/GED Office) is responsible for the state’s high school equivalency testing program.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • Applicants 16 and 17 years old may also take the GED tests if they have officially completed a home instruction program;
  • if their school board released them from compulsory attendance; if they are ISAEP students and scored at least 145 on all GED Ready practice tests;
  • if they have written permission from the state Department of Correctional Education;
  • if they have official documentation stating they have been expelled from school;
  • or if there is a court order that they must participate in the GED testing program.

For additional information and/or to learn more about current regulations, rules, and requirements in Virginia, go to the website of Virginia’s Department of Education at www.doe.virginia.gov

GED in Washington State

  • The Washington State Board of Education is responsible for the GED high school equivalency testing program in Washington State.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • Candidates 16 and 17 years of age may also qualify if they are officially withdrawn from school and if they hold documentation stating that they must take the GED exam to attend a post-secondary educational institution, to enter the military, or for employment purposes.
  • These younger applicants must have permission from a parent, guardian, or legal custodian.

The GED test is a state-specific exam and rules and/or requirements may change slightly over time. If you have any questions or want to learn more about current rules/regulations, please contact the Washington State Board of Education at www.sbe.wa.gov

GED in West Virginia

  • West Virginia’s Department of Education is responsible for the state’s high school equivalency testing program.
  • West Virginia uses the TASC (Test Assessing Secondary Completion) for this purpose.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 19 though younger applicants may qualify as well.
  • There are specific guidelines for applicants 16, 17, or 18 years of age.
  • Applicants under 18 years of age need to provide consent from a parent or legal guardian unless they are court-ordered, emancipated, or married.
  • They all must first pass a Pre Assessment.

TASC requirements and rules may change slightly. To be sure you know all about the latest developments, or if you have additional questions, contact the West Virginia Department of Education at wvde.state.wv.us/abe

GED in Wisconsin

  • The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction is responsible for the state’s high school equivalency (GED) testing program. A civics test must also be passed.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18.5
  • Applicants need to demonstrate that at the time of testing, they are at least 18.5 years of age or that their 9th-grade high school class has graduated.
  • Applicants ages 17 to 18.5 may also qualify years if they have permission from their school district, through a juvenile correctional facility, or if they are signed up for the Challenge Academy.

Regulations and requirements for GED testing can change slightly. If you have any questions or if you want to learn more about the latest developments, contact Wisconsin’s Department of Public Instruction at www.dpi.wi.gov/ged

GED in Wyoming

  • Wyoming’s Department of Education, through the Wyoming Community College Commission, is responsible for the state’s high school equivalency testing.
  • Wyoming offers two testing options: GED and HiSET.
  • Minimum Age for Testing – 18
  • Applicants 16 and 17 years old may also qualify for the Wyoming High School Equivalency Certificate (HSEC) if they hold an Age Waiver.
  • 16-year-olds must additionally provide written permission from a parent, a guardian, an adult basic education instructor, or a GED Examiner.
  • A court order may also qualify these youngsters for HSE testing.

As the GED is a state-specific exam, requirements and regulations may change slightly over time. If you have questions or if you wish to learn about the most recent developments, get in touch with the Wyoming Department of Education at www.edu.wyoming.gov

The GED test and the alternatives are rigorous exams. The passing standards are such a level that over 40 percent of all high school graduates would not be able to successfully take these tests at the first attempt. So good preparation is the key to success. This website offers you numerous entertaining video lessons and highly effective sample tests at no cost. So get ready, pass the GED exam, and work toward a brighter future for yourself and those around you.

 

Last Updated on September 6, 2021.