Reading Comprehension Tips

Reading comprehension is extremely important.

Oftentimes, you will be tested for what you read, so it’s important that you understand what you are reading.

 50%

Question 1 of 2

1. Read the passage below and answer the question that follows it.

Anastasia sat by the fountain in the park with her head in her palms. She was weeping mournfully and wearing all black. In between gasps and sobs, Anastasia cried out, “Oh... John…” And then her cell phone beeped. Her hand dived into her purse and her heart skipped a beat. It was a text message from John! She opened up the message and read the few stark words, “I need to get my jacket back from you.” Anastasia threw her head onto her arms and resumed sobbing.

1. Why is Anastasia crying?
A.
B.
C.
D.

Question 1 of 2

Question 2 of 2

2. 1. Which of the following best explains the problem with the analogy below?

'Students should be allowed to look at their textbooks during examinations. After all, surgeons have X-rays to guide them during an operation; lawyers have briefs to guide them during a trial; carpenters have blueprints to guide them when they are building a house. Why, then, shouldn't students be allowed to look at their textbooks during an examination?”

 
A.
B.
C.
D.

Question 2 of 2


 

Next Lesson: What is the Inference
Continue learning.

The transcript is provided for your convenience.
I have some simple reading comprehension tips written up here on the board that I want to go over.

The first is reading when you’re not tired. This is different times of day for different people, but for the most part, this means: do not read at night, because you’re going to be tired from the day’s activity.

Oftentimes, people cannot read in the morning either, because they are groggy from just having woken up. So, make sure you read at a time when you are very alert. Read for short time intervals. Don’t try to read for an hour or two at a time, because you’re going to get tired of reading, and not retaining what you read.

Try to read for 30-45 minutes, take a break, and then read again.

Read in a distraction-free environment. Get somewhere where your eyes and ears are not distracted. This means somewhere where there is not a lot of activity, and where it is quiet so that you can solely focus on reading.

Comprehend what you read. It’s very easy to read a page, and for your eyes to move down a page, but for your thoughts to be elsewhere. Stop and ask yourself as you’re reading, “what am I reading?”, and why is this important? Because you wouldn’t want to get to the end of a book, and not have understood anything in the book. You’d have to reread it. So, make sure you’re comprehending the book as you read it.

Skim what you’re about to read first. This means skimming the chapter. Reading a title page, reading the preface and introduction, reading a chapter summary, and then reading the chapter in its entirety.

Take advantage of the way a textbook is structured. Oftentimes, a textbook will have major headings, italicized words, and words in bold. These are important points that you should take note of.

Oftentimes, chapters will have a list of important points at the end, and a chapter summary. Read those as well, as those reemphasize the important points of the chapter.

Check Also: