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Science Process Skills

The science process skills include observing hypothesizing, ordering, categorizing, comparing inferring, applying and communicating.

These are all important science skills and for the most part, this list goes from easiest to hardest. If you want to understand one science skill, it’s good to know the science skills before it.

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Mini-test: SCIENCE PROCESS SKILLSQuestion 1: Inferring is
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B.
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D.

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Question 2 of 2

Question 2: Which of the following is an example of observation
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B.
C.
D.

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Next Lesson: Organic Evolution

The transcript is for your convenience.
I want to go over all of these and give a brief description of each. Observing is pretty self-explanatory, this is being able to write down an accurate description of something observed in nature or something observed in an experiment.

Hypothesizing is building off an observation. You take an observation, and then you form a prediction based on that remark. Ordering and categorizing are similar because they both have to do with the structure of information. In ordering, your taking information and maybe putting it in a list from most important to least important or you’re just putting it in some kind of order to make the information very accessible and very understandable.

Then categorizing, has to do with taking the information and putting it with other like information, so that you have different categories of information. Comparing has to do with noticing the similarities between different events or different experiments. This is important because sometimes two experiments or two scientific phenomena will look totally different, but through the scale of comparing, you’ll be able to notice the similarities between the two.

Now, inferring is different than hypothesizing, because hypothesizing is making a prediction of something that will happen, whereas inferring is making a prediction or making a conjecture about something that did happen. Hypothesizing is looking forward to a future event, while inferring is looking back to a past event, attempting to explain it from the information already known.

Now applying is taking a prediction and putting it into an experiment. In other words, you’re taking your observation and your hypothesis of what might happen and actually applying it to an experiment. Finally, we have communicating, which actually goes hand in hand with observing, because observing is making an accurate description of something you have seen.

While communicating is taking those observations and being able to communicate or tell that to someone else, that maybe by writing a description of it or by telling them about it. This is very important because by being able to communicate information, scientists are able to feed off each other discoveries. That’s why it’s important to be able to accurately communicate scientific information. Those are the science process skills.

Next Lesson: Organic Evolution