Language Arts Test Set 10

These Language Arts sample questions belong to our GED® test preparatory course.

Answer all of the questions.

Do not leave any of these questions unanswered.

1. Read this paragraph and draw a conclusion about what is happening.

John's mother is in the kitchen packing his lunch. She knocks on his bedroom door—again. "It's time to get up for school!" she calls. "Don't make me come back up here again!" John groans and rolls over, pulling a pillow down over his head, and consider his options. Could he pretend to be sick? Would she believe him?
A.
B.
C.

Question 1 of 5

2. Read the passage. Then draw conclusions to choose the best answer.

Ask them how plants differ from animals. They will say that plants are fixed to one place, while animals can move about; that plants have no will or consciousness, and that animals have.

These answers are true when we compare the higher animals with plants, but the differences become lost as we descend in the scale and approach the borderland where botanists and zoologists meet on common ground.

Sea‐anemones are fixed to the rock on which they grow, while some of the lower plants are able to move from place to place, and it is hardly safe to affirm that a jelly‐fish is more conscious of its actions than is a Sensitive Plant, the leaves of which close when the stem is touched.

Who is the intended audience of this text?
A.
B.
C.

Question 2 of 5

3. Read this paragraph and draw a conclusion about what is happening.

The other students look away when they see Matt in the hall. No one wants to attract his attention. And when someone does, the first thing everyone else thinks, thank God it's not me.
A.
B.
C.

Question 3 of 5

4. Read the passage. Then draw conclusions to choose the best answer.

Ask them how plants differ from animals. They will say that plants are fixed to one place, while animals can move about; that plants have no will or consciousness, and that animals have.

These answers are true when we compare the higher animals with plants, but the differences become lost as we descend in the scale and approach the borderland where botanists and zoologists meet on common ground.

Sea‐anemones are fixed to the rock on which they grow, while some of the lower plants are able to move from place to place, and it is hardly safe to affirm that a jelly‐fish is more conscious of its actions than is a Sensitive Plant, the leaves of which close when the stem is touched.

What is the main idea of this paragraph?
A.
B.
C.

Question 4 of 5

5. The squirrel ran along the ground searching for acorns. He quickly found one among the new-fallen leaves. He stuffed it into his cheek. Then he hurried off to bury it in the ground near his tree home. Then back he came to get another acorn.
Back and forth he ran, finding acorns and burying them. Finally, he climbed his tree and looked down at all the spots where he buried acorns. He looked pleased with his work.

In the winter, this squirrel probably will ...
A.
B.
C.
D.

Question 5 of 5


 

Take another practice test

GED Test Prep Tips

Taking a number of practice tests is important because they will indicate what your knowledge and skills gaps are. It’s important to identify your weak points so you can concentrate on learning these subject areas.

Studies have shown that students who frequently take practice tests get higher scores on the real test.

Recent GED graduates have good advice for you: don’t learn for all of the four subject tests at once.

You have the option to take the subtests one at a time. Prepare for one subtest, pass that section, and move ahead to the next subtest.

While preparing for the GED test, the most common slipup is that students forget to block time for learning.

Postponement and pretexts are among your biggest enemies. Adopt a learning schedule and please stick to it.

The second common mistake that leads to not passing the exam is that students spend way too much time on one question to end up not making it through the entire test.

 

Last Updated on August 18, 2020.

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