Practice Test – Language (RLA) set 2

These questions are written by our English Language guru and are similar to the GED Test. Each question has five answer choices. Choose the best answer for each question.

 

Question 1 of 23

1.

 It was the 6th of May, a day which corresponds to the 6th of November in the countries of the Northern Hemisphere. The sky had been obscured for some days, and it was of importance to make preparations for the winter. However, the temperature was not as yet much lower, and a centigrade thermometer, transported to Lincoln Island, would still have marked an average of ten to twelve degrees above zero. This was not surprising, since Lincoln Island, probably situated between the thirty-fifth and fortieth parallel, would be subject, in the Southern Hemisphere, to the same climate as Sicily or Greece in the Northern Hemisphere. But as Greece and Sicily have severe cold, producing snow and ice, so doubtless would Lincoln Island in the severest part of the winter and it was advisable to provide against it.

In any case if cold did not yet threaten [those who are stranded], the rainy season would begin, and on this lonely island, exposed to all the fury of the elements, in mid-ocean, bad weather would be frequent, and probably terrible. The question of a more comfortable dwelling than the Chimneys must therefore be seriously considered and promptly resolved on.

Jules Verne, “The Mysterious Island,” 1874

Why must the narrator search for a better dwelling place?
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 1 of 23

Question 2 of 23

2.

 It was the 6th of May, a day which corresponds to the 6th of November in the countries of the Northern Hemisphere. The sky had been obscured for some days, and it was of importance to make preparations for the winter. However, the temperature was not as yet much lower, and a centigrade thermometer, transported to Lincoln Island, would still have marked an average of ten to twelve degrees above zero. This was not surprising, since Lincoln Island, probably situated between the thirty-fifth and fortieth parallel, would be subject, in the Southern Hemisphere, to the same climate as Sicily or Greece in the Northern Hemisphere. But as Greece and Sicily have severe cold, producing snow and ice, so doubtless would Lincoln Island in the severest part of the winter and it was advisable to provide against it.


In any case if cold did not yet threaten [those who are stranded], the rainy season would begin, and on this lonely island, exposed to all the fury of the elements, in mid-ocean, bad weather would be frequent, and probably terrible. The question of a more comfortable dwelling than the Chimneys must therefore be seriously considered and promptly resolved on.



Jules Verne, “The Mysterious Island,” 1874



From the passage, what would you guess the profession of the narrator to be?
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 2 of 23

Question 3 of 23

3. Sentence 1: Market research and analysis show that the proposed advertising media for the new fall lines need to be reprioritized and changed. If you rewrote sentence 1 beginning with  In prior years, market research and analysis  the next two words should be
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 3 of 23

Question 4 of 23

4.

 It was the 6th of May, a day which corresponds to the 6th of November in the countries of the Northern Hemisphere. The sky had been obscured for some days, and it was of importance to make preparations for the winter. However, the temperature was not as yet much lower, and a centigrade thermometer, transported to Lincoln Island, would still have marked an average of ten to twelve degrees above zero. This was not surprising, since Lincoln Island, probably situated between the thirty-fifth and fortieth parallel, would be subject, in the Southern Hemisphere, to the same climate as Sicily or Greece in the Northern Hemisphere. But as Greece and Sicily have severe cold, producing snow and ice, so doubtless would Lincoln Island in the severest part of the winter and it was advisable to provide against it.


In any case if cold did not yet threaten [those who are stranded], the rainy season would begin, and on this lonely island, exposed to all the fury of the elements, in mid-ocean, bad weather would be frequent, and probably terrible. The question of a more comfortable dwelling than the Chimneys must therefore be seriously considered and promptly resolved on.



Jules Verne, “The Mysterious Island,” 1874



Why does the narrator twice reference Sicily and Greece?
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 4 of 23

Question 5 of 23

5. Sentence: No longer are young adults interested in sitcoms as they watch reality televisions shows now.

Which is the best way to change the underlined portion of the sentence?

A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 5 of 23

Question 6 of 23

6.

 It was the 6th of May, a day which corresponds to the 6th of November in the countries of the Northern Hemisphere. The sky had been obscured for some days, and it was of importance to make preparations for the winter. However, the temperature was not as yet much lower, and a centigrade thermometer, transported to Lincoln Island, would still have marked an average of ten to twelve degrees above zero. This was not surprising, since Lincoln Island, probably situated between the thirty-fifth and fortieth parallel, would be subject, in the Southern Hemisphere, to the same climate as Sicily or Greece in the Northern Hemisphere. But as Greece and Sicily have severe cold, producing snow and ice, so doubtless would Lincoln Island in the severest part of the winter and it was advisable to provide against it.

In any case if cold did not yet threaten [those who are stranded], the rainy season would begin, and on this lonely island, exposed to all the fury of the elements, in mid-ocean, bad weather would be frequent, and probably terrible. The question of a more comfortable dwelling than the Chimneys must therefore be seriously considered and promptly resolved on.

Jules Verne, “The Mysterious Island,” 1874

Why does the narrator focus so heavily on the weather?

A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 6 of 23

Question 7 of 23

7. Shifting our efforts from our other media sources, such as radio and magazines to these popular internet sites, will more effectively promote our product sales.

Which is the best way to write the underlined portion of this sentence? If the original is the best way, choose option (1).

A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 7 of 23

Question 8 of 23

8.

DO YOU BELIEVE ONE CAN OVERCOME UTTER POVERTY AND GET RICH?

Is there anything that Will Smith can’t do? He has survived Bel-Air, saved the world from an alien invasion and captured the essence of boxing great Muhammed Ali. He’s even managed to stay out of the tabloids, while his high-caliber peers get ruthlessly hounded by the paparazzi.

With Pursuit of Happyness, Smith takes on a truly challenging role and shines once again; he is, hands down, the best thing about the movie. Starring alongside his adorable 8-year-old son, Jaden, he turns in a raw, heartbreaking performance as a man who struggles to give his child the quality life that escaped him—surmounting a lack of education, stubborn naysayers and homelessness to become a rags-to-richesphenomenon.

But, as we know, very few homeless people will go on to become Chris Gardner, the man whose struggles in the early ‘80s inspired the movie. The Pursuit of Happyness, otherwise known as the arch-rival of Microsoft’s spell check, ultimately cracks under the weight of its hefty ambitions by never realizing when enough is enough.

In the story, Gardner (Smith) is a salesman with an ample supply of bone density scanners collected during an ill-conceived investment plan that has yet to pay off. His girlfriend, Linda (Thandie Newton), is fed up with having to work double shifts while he strolls around town holding these strange devices, only to return by nightfall with a skinny wallet. They have a son together (Jaden) who spends a lot of time in day care watching TV reruns. Point blank, they are going nowhere fast.

When money woes are pushed to the breaking point, Linda decides it’s time to go. Are we really supposed to believe that she would just abandon her son, who she seems to care about, and leave him in the hands of someone she deems a loser? There is absolutely nothing in the film to suggest that she is mentally unstable or would disappear without her child—except that it sets up a convenient launching pad to paint Chris as a victim.

It’s also hard to believe that while wearing bum clothes and sporting a paint-smeared face, Chris would land an internship at a prestigious brokerage firm on sheer wit alone. While the film is based on a true story—or, rather, “inspired by a true story,” which means barely resembling what actually occurred—you shouldn't have to get a lobotomy to enjoy it.

For a movie to be inspiring, you have to fully believe the hero’s plight. You have to be right there with him, standing on the sidelines and cheering until he marches to glory with his head held high. Pursuit of Happyness never really allows that because it values emotion over common sense, sentimentalism over logic. It’s a “real” story, but it feels like it was chewed up and spit out by the Hollywood machine.

The Pursuit of Happyness, 2006

What image of Will Smith is portrayed in the first paragraph of the review?
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 8 of 23

Question 9 of 23

9. Sentence 7: As the trend for cultural icons to goes digital, so must our marketing plans.

 Which correction should be made to sentence 7?
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 9 of 23

Question 10 of 23

10.

DO YOU BELIEVE ONE CAN OVERCOME UTTER POVERTY AND GET RICH?

 

Is there anything that Will Smith can’t do? He has survived Bel-Air, saved the world from an alien invasion and captured the essence of boxing great Muhammed Ali. He’s even managed to stay out of the tabloids, while his high-caliber peers get ruthlessly hounded by the paparazzi.

With Pursuit of Happyness, Smith takes on a truly challenging role and shines once again; he is, hands down, the best thing about the movie. Starring alongside his adorable 8-year-old son, Jaden, he turns in a raw, heartbreaking performance as a man who struggles to give his child the quality life that escaped him—surmounting a lack of education, stubborn naysayers and homelessness to become a rags-to-richesphenomenon.

But, as we know, very few homeless people will go on to become Chris Gardner, the man whose struggles in the early ‘80s inspired the movie. The Pursuit of Happyness, otherwise known as the arch-rival of Microsoft’s spell check, ultimately cracks under the weight of its hefty ambitions by never realizing when enough is enough.

In the story, Gardner (Smith) is a salesman with an ample supply of bone density scanners collected during an ill-conceived investment plan that has yet to pay off. His girlfriend, Linda (Thandie Newton), is fed up with having to work double shifts while he strolls around town holding these strange devices, only to return by nightfall with a skinny wallet. They have a son together (Jaden) who spends a lot of time in day care watching TV reruns. Point blank, they are going nowhere fast.

When money woes are pushed to the breaking point, Linda decides it’s time to go. Are we really supposed to believe that she would just abandon her son, who she seems to care about, and leave him in the hands of someone she deems a loser? There is absolutely nothing in the film to suggest that she is mentally unstable or would disappear without her child—except that it sets up a convenient launching pad to paint Chris as a victim.

It’s also hard to believe that while wearing bum clothes and sporting a paint-smeared face, Chris would land an internship at a prestigious brokerage firm on sheer wit alone. While the film is based on a true story—or, rather, “inspired by a true story,” which means barely resembling what actually occurred—you shouldn't have to get a lobotomy to enjoy it.

For a movie to be inspiring, you have to fully believe the hero’s plight. You have to be right there with him, standing on the sidelines and cheering until he marches to glory with his head held high. Pursuit of Happyness never really allows that because it values emotion over common sense, sentimentalism over logic. It’s a “real” story, but it feels like it was chewed up and spit out by the Hollywood machine.

 

The Pursuit of Happyness, 2006

What is the author of the review suggesting with the words, “rags-to-riches phenomenon”?
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 10 of 23

Question 11 of 23

11.

DO YOU BELIEVE ONE CAN OVERCOME UTTER POVERTY AND GET RICH?

 

Is there anything that Will Smith can’t do? He has survived Bel-Air, saved the world from an alien invasion and captured the essence of boxing great Muhammed Ali. He’s even managed to stay out of the tabloids, while his high-caliber peers get ruthlessly hounded by the paparazzi.

With Pursuit of Happyness, Smith takes on a truly challenging role and shines once again; he is, hands down, the best thing about the movie. Starring alongside his adorable 8-year-old son, Jaden, he turns in a raw, heartbreaking performance as a man who struggles to give his child the quality life that escaped him—surmounting a lack of education, stubborn naysayers and homelessness to become a rags-to-richesphenomenon.

But, as we know, very few homeless people will go on to become Chris Gardner, the man whose struggles in the early ‘80s inspired the movie. The Pursuit of Happyness, otherwise known as the arch-rival of Microsoft’s spell check, ultimately cracks under the weight of its hefty ambitions by never realizing when enough is enough.

In the story, Gardner (Smith) is a salesman with an ample supply of bone density scanners collected during an ill-conceived investment plan that has yet to pay off. His girlfriend, Linda (Thandie Newton), is fed up with having to work double shifts while he strolls around town holding these strange devices, only to return by nightfall with a skinny wallet. They have a son together (Jaden) who spends a lot of time in day care watching TV reruns. Point blank, they are going nowhere fast.

When money woes are pushed to the breaking point, Linda decides it’s time to go. Are we really supposed to believe that she would just abandon her son, who she seems to care about, and leave him in the hands of someone she deems a loser? There is absolutely nothing in the film to suggest that she is mentally unstable or would disappear without her child—except that it sets up a convenient launching pad to paint Chris as a victim.

It’s also hard to believe that while wearing bum clothes and sporting a paint-smeared face, Chris would land an internship at a prestigious brokerage firm on sheer wit alone. While the film is based on a true story—or, rather, “inspired by a true story,” which means barely resembling what actually occurred—you shouldn't have to get a lobotomy to enjoy it.

For a movie to be inspiring, you have to fully believe the hero’s plight. You have to be right there with him, standing on the sidelines and cheering until he marches to glory with his head held high. Pursuit of Happyness never really allows that because it values emotion over common sense, sentimentalism over logic. It’s a “real” story, but it feels like it was chewed up and spit out by the Hollywood machine.

 

 The Pursuit of Happyness, 2006

What can be inferred about the character’s state-of-affairs from Paragraph 4?
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 11 of 23

Question 12 of 23

12.

DO YOU BELIEVE ONE CAN OVERCOME UTTER POVERTY AND GET RICH?

 

Is there anything that Will Smith can’t do? He has survived Bel-Air, saved the world from an alien invasion and captured the essence of boxing great Muhammed Ali. He’s even managed to stay out of the tabloids, while his high-caliber peers get ruthlessly hounded by the paparazzi.

With Pursuit of Happyness, Smith takes on a truly challenging role and shines once again; he is, hands down, the best thing about the movie. Starring alongside his adorable 8-year-old son, Jaden, he turns in a raw, heartbreaking performance as a man who struggles to give his child the quality life that escaped him—surmounting a lack of education, stubborn naysayers and homelessness to become a rags-to-richesphenomenon.

But, as we know, very few homeless people will go on to become Chris Gardner, the man whose struggles in the early ‘80s inspired the movie. The Pursuit of Happyness, otherwise known as the arch-rival of Microsoft’s spell check, ultimately cracks under the weight of its hefty ambitions by never realizing when enough is enough.

In the story, Gardner (Smith) is a salesman with an ample supply of bone density scanners collected during an ill-conceived investment plan that has yet to pay off. His girlfriend, Linda (Thandie Newton), is fed up with having to work double shifts while he strolls around town holding these strange devices, only to return by nightfall with a skinny wallet. They have a son together (Jaden) who spends a lot of time in day care watching TV reruns. Point blank, they are going nowhere fast.

When money woes are pushed to the breaking point, Linda decides it’s time to go. Are we really supposed to believe that she would just abandon her son, who she seems to care about, and leave him in the hands of someone she deems a loser? There is absolutely nothing in the film to suggest that she is mentally unstable or would disappear without her child—except that it sets up a convenient launching pad to paint Chris as a victim.

It’s also hard to believe that while wearing bum clothes and sporting a paint-smeared face, Chris would land an internship at a prestigious brokerage firm on sheer wit alone. While the film is based on a true story—or, rather, “inspired by a true story,” which means barely resembling what actually occurred—you shouldn't have to get a lobotomy to enjoy it.

For a movie to be inspiring, you have to fully believe the hero’s plight. You have to be right there with him, standing on the sidelines and cheering until he marches to glory with his head held high. Pursuit of Happyness never really allows that because it values emotion over common sense, sentimentalism over logic. It’s a “real” story, but it feels like it was chewed up and spit out by the Hollywood machine.

 

 The Pursuit of Happyness, 2006

Which of the following arguments does the author of the review give to support his negative opinion of the film?

A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 12 of 23

Question 13 of 23

13.

 IS MARRIAGE A KILLER OF ROMANCE?

 

ALGERNON: How immensely you must amuse them! [Goes over and takes sandwich.] By the way, Shropshire is your county, is it not?

 

JACK: Eh? Shropshire? Yes, of course. Hallo! Why all these cups? Why cucumber sandwiches? Why such reckless extravagance in one so young? Who is coming to tea?

 

ALGERNON: Oh! merely Aunt Augusta and Gwendolen.

 

JACK: How perfectly delightful!

 

ALGERNON: Yes, that is all very well; but I am afraid Aunt Augusta won't quite approve of your being here.

 

JACK: May I ask why?

 

ALGERNON: My dear fellow, the way you flirt with Gwendolen is perfectly disgraceful. It is almost as bad as the way Gwendolen flirts with you.

 

JACK: I am in love with Gwendolen. I have come up to town expressly to propose to her.

 

ALGERNON: I thought you had come up for pleasure? . . . I call that business.

 

JACK: How utterly unromantic you are!

 

ALGERNON: I really don't see anything romantic in proposing. It is very romantic to be in love. But there is nothing romantic about a definite proposal. Why, one may be accepted. One usually is, I believe. Then the excitement is all over. The very essence of romance is uncertainty. If ever I get married, I'll certainly try to forget the fact.

 

JACK: I have no doubt about that, dear Algy. The Divorce Court was specially invented for people whose memories are so curiously constituted.

 

ALGERNON: Oh! there is no use speculating on that subject. Divorces are made in Heaven - [JACK puts out his hand to take a sandwich. ALGERNON at once interferes.] Please don't touch the cucumber sandwiches. They are ordered specially for Aunt Augusta. [Takes one and eats it.]

 

JACK: Well, you have been eating them all the time.

 

ALGERNON: That is quite a different matter. She is my aunt. [Takes plate from below.] Have some bread and butter. The bread and butter is for Gwendolen. Gwendolen is devoted to bread and butter.

 

JACK: [Advancing to table and helping himself.] And very good bread and butter it is too.

 

ALGERNON: Well, my dear fellow, you need not eat as if you were going to eat it all. You behave as if you were married to her already. You are not married to her already, and I don't think you ever will be.

 

JACK: Why on earth do you say that?

 

ALGERNON: Well, in the first place girls never marry the men they flirt with. Girls don't think it right.

 

JACK: Oh, that is nonsense!

 

ALGERNON: It isn't. It is a great truth. It accounts for the extraordinary number of bachelors that one sees all over the place. In the second place, I don't give my consent.

 

JACK: Your consent!

 

Oscar Wilde, excerpted from  The Importance of Being Earnest , 1895

What can be inferred about Jack from the first lines exchanged with Algernon?
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 13 of 23

Question 14 of 23

14.

 IS MARRIAGE A KILLER OF ROMANCE?

 

ALGERNON: How immensely you must amuse them! [Goes over and takes sandwich.] By the way, Shropshire is your county, is it not?

 

JACK: Eh? Shropshire? Yes, of course. Hallo! Why all these cups? Why cucumber sandwiches? Why such reckless extravagance in one so young? Who is coming to tea?

 

ALGERNON: Oh! merely Aunt Augusta and Gwendolen.

 

JACK: How perfectly delightful!

 

ALGERNON: Yes, that is all very well; but I am afraid Aunt Augusta won't quite approve of your being here.

 

JACK: May I ask why?

 

ALGERNON: My dear fellow, the way you flirt with Gwendolen is perfectly disgraceful. It is almost as bad as the way Gwendolen flirts with you.

 

JACK: I am in love with Gwendolen. I have come up to town expressly to propose to her.

 

ALGERNON. I thought you had come up for pleasure? . . . I call that business.

 

JACK: How utterly unromantic you are!

 

ALGERNON: I really don't see anything romantic in proposing. It is very romantic to be in love. But there is nothing romantic about a definite proposal. Why, one may be accepted. One usually is, I believe. Then the excitement is all over. The very essence of romance is uncertainty. If ever I get married, I'll certainly try to forget the fact.

 

JACK: I have no doubt about that, dear Algy. The Divorce Court was specially invented for people whose memories are so curiously constituted.

 

ALGERNON: Oh! there is no use speculating on that subject. Divorces are made in Heaven - [JACK puts out his hand to take a sandwich. ALGERNON at once interferes.] Please don't touch the cucumber sandwiches. They are ordered specially for Aunt Augusta. [Takes one and eats it.]

 

JACK: Well, you have been eating them all the time.

 

ALGERNON: That is quite a different matter. She is my aunt. [Takes plate from below.] Have some bread and butter. The bread and butter is for Gwendolen. Gwendolen is devoted to bread and butter.

 

JACK: [Advancing to table and helping himself.] And very good bread and butter it is too.

 

ALGERNON: Well, my dear fellow, you need not eat as if you were going to eat it all. You behave as if you were married to her already. You are not married to her already, and I don't think you ever will be.

 

JACK: Why on earth do you say that?

 

ALGERNON: Well, in the first place girls never marry the men they flirt with. Girls don't think it right.

 

JACK: Oh, that is nonsense!

 

ALGERNON: It isn't. It is a great truth. It accounts for the extraordinary number of bachelors that one sees all over the place. In the second place, I don't give my consent.

 

JACK: Your consent!

 

Oscar Wilde, excerpted from  The Importance of Being Earnest , 1895

What is Algernon’s view of marriage?
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 14 of 23

Question 15 of 23

15.

 IS MARRIAGE A KILLER OF ROMANCE?

 

ALGERNON: How immensely you must amuse them! [Goes over and takes sandwich.] By the way, Shropshire is your county, is it not?

 

JACK: Eh? Shropshire? Yes, of course. Hallo! Why all these cups? Why cucumber sandwiches? Why such reckless extravagance in one so young? Who is coming to tea?

 

ALGERNON: Oh! merely Aunt Augusta and Gwendolen.

 

JACK: How perfectly delightful!

 

ALGERNON: Yes, that is all very well; but I am afraid Aunt Augusta won't quite approve of your being here.

 

JACK: May I ask why?

 

ALGERNON: My dear fellow, the way you flirt with Gwendolen is perfectly disgraceful. It is almost as bad as the way Gwendolen flirts with you.

 

JACK: I am in love with Gwendolen. I have come up to town expressly to propose to her.

 

ALGERNON: I thought you had come up for pleasure? . . . I call that business.

 

JACK: How utterly unromantic you are!

 

ALGERNON: I really don't see anything romantic in proposing. It is very romantic to be in love. But there is nothing romantic about a definite proposal. Why, one may be accepted. One usually is, I believe. Then the excitement is all over. The very essence of romance is uncertainty. If ever I get married, I'll certainly try to forget the fact.

 

JACK: I have no doubt about that, dear Algy. The Divorce Court was specially invented for people whose memories are so curiously constituted.

 

ALGERNON: Oh! there is no use speculating on that subject. Divorces are made in Heaven - [JACK puts out his hand to take a sandwich. ALGERNON at once interferes.] Please don't touch the cucumber sandwiches. They are ordered specially for Aunt Augusta. [Takes one and eats it.]

 

JACK: Well, you have been eating them all the time.

 

ALGERNON: That is quite a different matter. She is my aunt. [Takes plate from below.] Have some bread and butter. The bread and butter is for Gwendolen. Gwendolen is devoted to bread and butter.

 

JACK: [Advancing to table and helping himself.] And very good bread and butter it is too.

 

ALGERNON: Well, my dear fellow, you need not eat as if you were going to eat it all. You behave as if you were married to her already. You are not married to her already, and I don't think you ever will be.

 

JACK: Why on earth do you say that?

 

ALGERNON: Well, in the first place girls never marry the men they flirt with. Girls don't think it right.

 

JACK: Oh, that is nonsense!

 

ALGERNON: It isn't. It is a great truth. It accounts for the extraordinary number of bachelors that one sees all over the place. In the second place, I don't give my consent.

 

JACK: Your consent!

 

Oscar Wilde, excerpted from  The Importance of Being Earnest , 1895

What would Algernon most likely do if he were married?
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 15 of 23

Question 16 of 23

16.

 IS MARRIAGE A KILLER OF ROMANCE?

 

ALGERNON: How immensely you must amuse them! [Goes over and takes sandwich.] By the way, Shropshire is your county, is it not?

 

JACK: Eh? Shropshire? Yes, of course. Hallo! Why all these cups? Why cucumber sandwiches? Why such reckless extravagance in one so young? Who is coming to tea?

 

ALGERNON: Oh! merely Aunt Augusta and Gwendolen.

 

JACK: How perfectly delightful!

 

ALGERNON: Yes, that is all very well; but I am afraid Aunt Augusta won't quite approve of your being here.

 

JACK: May I ask why?

 

ALGERNON: My dear fellow, the way you flirt with Gwendolen is perfectly disgraceful. It is almost as bad as the way Gwendolen flirts with you.

 

JACK: I am in love with Gwendolen. I have come up to town expressly to propose to her.

 

ALGERNON: I thought you had come up for pleasure? . . . I call that business.

 

JACK: How utterly unromantic you are!

 

ALGERNON: I really don't see anything romantic in proposing. It is very romantic to be in love. But there is nothing romantic about a definite proposal. Why, one may be accepted. One usually is, I believe. Then the excitement is all over. The very essence of romance is uncertainty. If ever I get married, I'll certainly try to forget the fact.

 

JACK: I have no doubt about that, dear Algy. The Divorce Court was specially invented for people whose memories are so curiously constituted.

 

ALGERNON: Oh! there is no use speculating on that subject. Divorces are made in Heaven - [JACK puts out his hand to take a sandwich. ALGERNON at once interferes.] Please don't touch the cucumber sandwiches. They are ordered specially for Aunt Augusta. [Takes one and eats it.]

 

JACK: Well, you have been eating them all the time.

 

ALGERNON: That is quite a different matter. She is my aunt. [Takes plate from below.] Have some bread and butter. The bread and butter is for Gwendolen. Gwendolen is devoted to bread and butter.

 

JACK: [Advancing to table and helping himself.] And very good bread and butter it is too.

 

ALGERNON: Well, my dear fellow, you need not eat as if you were going to eat it all. You behave as if you were married to her already. You are not married to her already, and I don't think you ever will be.

 

JACK: Why on earth do you say that?

 

ALGERNON: Well, in the first place girls never marry the men they flirt with. Girls don't think it right.

 

JACK: Oh, that is nonsense!

 

ALGERNON: It isn't. It is a great truth. It accounts for the extraordinary number of bachelors that one sees all over the place. In the second place, I don't give my consent.

 

JACK: Your consent!

 

Oscar Wilde, excerpted from  The Importance of Being Earnest , 1895

Which of the following attributes best describe the tone of the excerpt?
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 16 of 23

Question 17 of 23

17.

The History of the @ Sign

(1) In 1972, Ray Tomlinson sent the first electronic message, now known as e-mail, using the @ symbol to indicate the location or institution of the e-mail recipient. (2) Tomlinson, using a Model 33 Teletype device, understood that he needed to use a symbol that would not appear in anyone's name so that there was no confusion. (3) The logical choice for Tomlinson was the 'at sign,' both it was unlikely to appear in anyone's name and also because it represented the word 'at,' as in a particular user is sitting @ this specific computer.

 

(4) However, before the symbol became a standard key on typewriter keyboards in the 1880s and a standard on QWERTY keyboards in the 1940s, the @ sign had a long if somewhat sketchy history of use throughout the world. (5) Linguists are divided as to when the symbol first appeared. (6) Some argue that the symbol dates back to the 6th or 7th centuries when Latin scribes adapted the symbol from the Latin word ad, meaning at, to or toward. (7) The scribes, in an attempt to simplify the amount of pen strokes they were using, created the ligature combination of two or more letters by exaggerating the upstroke of the letter 'd' and curving it to the left over the 'a.'

 

(8) Other linguists will argue that the @ sign is a more recent development, appearing sometime in the 18th century as a symbol used in commerce to indicate price per unit, as in 2 chickens @ 10 pence. (9) While these theories are largely speculative, in 2000 Giorgio Stabile, a professor of the history of science at La Sapienza University in Italy, discovered some original 14th-century documents clearly marked with the @ sign to indicate a measure of quantity - the amphora, meaning jar. (10) The amphora was a standard-sized terra cotta vessel used to carry wine and grain among merchants, and, according to Stabile, the use of the @ symbol ( the upper-case 'A' embellished in the typical Florentine script) in trade led to its contemporary meaning of 'at the price of.'

 

June, 2010

 Sentence 1: In 1972, Ray Tomlinson sent the first electronic message, now known as e-mail, using the @ symbol to indicate the location or institution of the e-mail recipient.

 

If you rewrote Sentence 1 beginning with 

 

The first electronic message, known nowadays as e-mail, was sent in 1972 by Ray Tomlinson

 

The second portion of the sentence should be

A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 17 of 23

Question 18 of 23

18.

The History of the @ Sign

 

(1) In 1972, Ray Tomlinson sent the first electronic message, now known as e-mail, using the @ symbol to indicate the location or institution of the e-mail recipient. (2) Tomlinson, using a Model 33 Teletype device, understood that he needed to use a symbol that would not appear in anyone's name so that there was no confusion. (3) The logical choice for Tomlinson was the 'at sign,' both it was unlikely to appear in anyone's name and also because it represented the word 'at,' as in a particular user is sitting @ this specific computer.

(4) However, before the symbol became a standard key on typewriter keyboards in the 1880s and a standard on QWERTY keyboards in the 1940s, the@ sign had a long if somewhat sketchy history of use throughout the world. (5) Linguists are divided as to when the symbol first appeared. (6) Some argue that the symbol dates back to the 6th or 7th centuries when Latin scribes adapted the symbol from the Latin word ad, meaning at, to or toward. (7) The scribes, in an attempt to simplify the amount of pen strokes they were using, created the ligature combination of two or more letters by exaggerating the upstroke of the letter 'd' and curving it to the left over the 'a.'

 

(8) Other linguists will argue that the @ sign is a more recent development, appearing sometime in the 18th century as a symbol used in commerce to indicate price per unit, as in 2 chickens @ 10 pence. (9) While these theories are largely speculative, in 2000 Giorgio Stabile, a professor of the history of science at La Sapienza University in Italy, discovered some original 14th-century documents clearly marked with the @ sign to indicate a measure of quantity - the amphora, meaning jar. (10) The amphora was a standard-sized terra cotta vessel used to carry wine and grain among merchants, and, according to Stabile, the use of the @ symbol ( the upper-case 'A' embellished in the typical Florentine script) in trade led to its contemporary meaning of 'at the price of.'

 

 June, 2010

Sentence 3: The logical choice for Tomlinson was the 'at sign,'both it was unlikely to appear in anyone's name and also because it represented the word 'at,' as in a particular user is sitting @ this specific computer.

Which is the best way to write the underlined portion of this sentence? If the original is the best way, choose option (1).

A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 18 of 23

Question 19 of 23

19.

The History of the @ Sign

 

(1) In 1972, Ray Tomlinson sent the first electronic message, now known as e-mail, using the @ symbol to indicate the location or institution of the e-mail recipient. (2) Tomlinson, using a Model 33 Teletype device, understood that he needed to use a symbol that would not appear in anyone's name so that there was no confusion. (3) The logical choice for Tomlinson was the 'at sign,' both it was unlikely to appear in anyone's name and also because it represented the word 'at,' as in a particular user is sitting @ this specific computer.

 

(4) However, before the symbol became a standard key on typewriter keyboards in the 1880s and a standard on QWERTY keyboards in the 1940s, the@ sign had a long if somewhat sketchy history of use throughout the world. (5) Linguists are divided as to when the symbol first appeared. (6) Some argue that the symbol dates back to the 6th or 7th centuries when Latin scribes adapted the symbol from the Latin word ad, meaning at, to or toward. (7) The scribes, in an attempt to simplify the amount of pen strokes they were using, created the ligature combination of two or more letters by exaggerating the upstroke of the letter 'd' and curving it to the left over the 'a.'

 

(8) Other linguists will argue that the @ sign is a more recent development, appearing sometime in the 18th century as a symbol used in commerce to indicate price per unit, as in 2 chickens @ 10 pence. (9) While these theories are largely speculative, in 2000 Giorgio Stabile, a professor of the history of science at La Sapienza University in Italy, discovered some original 14th-century documents clearly marked with the @ sign to indicate a measure of quantity - the amphora, meaning jar. (10) The amphora was a standard-sized terra cotta vessel used to carry wine and grain among merchants, and, according to Stabile, the use of the @ symbol ( the upper-case 'A' embellished in the typical Florentine script) in trade led to its contemporary meaning of 'at the price of.'

 

June, 2010

Sentence 6: Some argue that the symbol dates back to the 6th or 7th centuries when Latin scribes adapted the symbol from the Latin word ad, meaning at, to or toward.Which correction should be made to Sentence 6?
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 19 of 23

Question 20 of 23

20.

The History of the @ Sign

 

(1) In 1972, Ray Tomlinson sent the first electronic message, now known as e-mail, using the @ symbol to indicate the location or institution of the e-mail recipient. (2) Tomlinson, using a Model 33 Teletype device, understood that he needed to use a symbol that would not appear in anyone's name so that there was no confusion. (3) The logical choice for Tomlinson was the 'at sign,' both it was unlikely to appear in anyone's name and also because it represented the word 'at,' as in a particular user is sitting @ this specific computer.

 

(4) However, before the symbol became a standard key on typewriter keyboards in the 1880s and a standard on QWERTY keyboards in the 1940s, the@ sign had a long if somewhat sketchy history of use throughout the world. (5) Linguists are divided as to when the symbol first appeared. (6) Some argue that the symbol dates back to the 6th or 7th centuries when Latin scribes adapted the symbol from the Latin word ad, meaning at, to or toward. (7) The scribes, in an attempt to simplify the amount of pen strokes they were using, created the ligature combination of two or more letters by exaggerating the upstroke of the letter 'd' and curving it to the left over the 'a.'

(8) Other linguists will argue that the @ sign is a more recent development, appearing sometime in the 18th century as a symbol used in commerce to indicate price per unit, as in 2 chickens @ 10 pence. (9) While these theories are largely speculative, in 2000 Giorgio Stabile, a professor of the history of science at La Sapienza University in Italy, discovered some original 14th-century documents clearly marked with the @ sign to indicate a measure of quantity - the amphora, meaning jar. (10) The amphora was a standard-sized terra cotta vessel used to carry wine and grain among merchants, and, according to Stabile, the use of the @ symbol ( the upper-case 'A' embellished in the typical Florentine script) in trade led to its contemporary meaning of 'at the price of.'

 June, 2010

Sentence 7: The scribes, in an attempt to simplify the amount of pen strokes they were using, created the ligature combination of two or more letters by exaggerating the upstroke of the letter 'd' and curving it to the left over the 'a.'Which correction should be made to Sentence 7?
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 20 of 23

Question 21 of 23

21.

The History of the @ Sign

 

(1) In 1972, Ray Tomlinson sent the first electronic message, now known as e-mail, using the @ symbol to indicate the location or institution of the e-mail recipient. (2) Tomlinson, using a Model 33 Teletype device, understood that he needed to use a symbol that would not appear in anyone's name so that there was no confusion. (3) The logical choice for Tomlinson was the 'at sign,' both it was unlikely to appear in anyone's name and also because it represented the word 'at,' as in a particular user is sitting @ this specific computer.

 

(4) However, before the symbol became a standard key on typewriter keyboards in the 1880s and a standard on QWERTY keyboards in the 1940s, the@ sign had a long if somewhat sketchy history of use throughout the world. (5) Linguists are divided as to when the symbol first appeared. (6) Some argue that the symbol dates back to the 6th or 7th centuries when Latin scribes adapted the symbol from the Latin word ad, meaning at, to or toward. (7) The scribes, in an attempt to simplify the amount of pen strokes they were using, created the ligature combination of two or more letters by exaggerating the upstroke of the letter 'd' and curving it to the left over the 'a.'

 

(8) Other linguists will argue that the @ sign is a more recent development, appearing sometime in the 18th century as a symbol used in commerce to indicate price per unit, as in 2 chickens @ 10 pence. (9) While these theories are largely speculative, in 2000 Giorgio Stabile, a professor of the history of science at La Sapienza University in Italy, discovered some original 14th-century documents clearly marked with the @ sign to indicate a measure of quantity - the amphora, meaning jar. (10) The amphora was a standard-sized terra cotta vessel used to carry wine and grain among merchants, and, according to Stabile, the use of the @ symbol ( the upper-case 'A' embellished in the typical Florentine script) in trade led to its contemporary meaning of 'at the price of.'

 

June, 2010

Sentence 8: Other linguists will argue that the @ sign is a more recent development, appearing sometime in the 18th century as a symbol used in commerce to indicate price per unit, as in 2 chickens @ 10 pence.Which is the best way to write the underlined portion of this sentence? If the original is the best way, choose option (1).
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 21 of 23

Question 22 of 23

22.

The History of the @ Sign

 

(1) In 1972, Ray Tomlinson sent the first electronic message, now known as e-mail, using the @ symbol to indicate the location or institution of the e-mail recipient. (2) Tomlinson, using a Model 33 Teletype device, understood that he needed to use a symbol that would not appear in anyone's name so that there was no confusion. (3) The logical choice for Tomlinson was the 'at sign,' both it was unlikely to appear in anyone's name and also because it represented the word 'at,' as in a particular user is sitting @ this specific computer.

 

(4) However, before the symbol became a standard key on typewriter keyboards in the 1880s and a standard on QWERTY keyboards in the 1940s, the@ sign had a long if somewhat sketchy history of use throughout the world. (5) Linguists are divided as to when the symbol first appeared. (6) Some argue that the symbol dates back to the 6th or 7th centuries when Latin scribes adapted the symbol from the Latin word ad, meaning at, to or toward. (7) The scribes, in an attempt to simplify the amount of pen strokes they were using, created the ligature combination of two or more letters by exaggerating the upstroke of the letter 'd' and curving it to the left over the 'a.'

 

(8) Other linguists will argue that the @ sign is a more recent development, appearing sometime in the 18th century as a symbol used in commerce to indicate price per unit, as in 2 chickens @ 10 pence. (9) While these theories are largely speculative, in 2000 Giorgio Stabile, a professor of the history of science at La Sapienza University in Italy, discovered some original 14th-century documents clearly marked with the @ sign to indicate a measure of quantity - the amphora, meaning jar. (10) The amphora was a standard-sized terra cotta vessel used to carry wine and grain among merchants, and, according to Stabile, the use of the @ symbol ( the upper-case 'A' embellished in the typical Florentine script) in trade led to its contemporary meaning of 'at the price of.'

 

www.webopedia.com, June, 2010

Sentence 9: While these theories are largely speculative, in 2000 Giorgio Stabile, a professor of the history of science at La Sapienza university in Italy, discovered some original 14th-century documents clearly marked with the @ sign to indicate a measure of quantity - the amphora, meaning jar.

Which correction should be made to Sentence 9?

A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 22 of 23

Question 23 of 23

23.

Are Employees Intangible Assets?

(A)

(1) An influential paper in the Harvard Business Review in 2004 noted that the skills and talents of a company's workforce constitute an intangible asset - and that such assets 'are worth far more to many companies than their tangible assets.' (2) If your business has talented employees, you might well agree with this assessment. (3) But you can't list the value of those talents as an asset on your balance sheet.

(B)

Tangible vs. Intangible Assets

(4) Your company's assets fall into two categories: tangible and intangible. (5) Tangible assets are the ones you can touch: buildings, equipment, inventory and the like. (6) Financial resources also count as tangible; even though money is often just a number on a computer, it has a defined and universally agreed-upon value. (7) Intangible assets are the ones without a physical manifestation. (8) They include intellectual property such as patents, trademarks and copyrights, as well as market share, customer loyalty and human capital -- the term for the talent and ability of the workforce.

(C)

People vs. Skills

(9) At first glance, it would seem that your employees are tangible assets. (10) After all, they're standing right there in a physical form. (11) But while it's common for businesses to describe their employees as valuable assets, it's not really the employees -- the flesh-and-blood individuals -- that are the assets. (12) Rather, it's their abilities. (13) When a talented, skilled worker leaves your company, you can't replace her just by bringing in a warm body off the street. (14) You need someone with equivalent abilities. (15) The skill set of your company's workers, more than the workers themselves, is an asset, and since abilities can't be touched, it's an intangible asset.

(D)

Accounting Treatment

(16) Whether your employees count as intangible assets is mostly a thought exercise, as you can't include them as assets on your balance sheet. (17) U.S. accounting rules include a few overarching criteria for putting an asset on the balance sheet; The asset must have future economic benefits, and the company must either own the asset or have control equal to ownership. (18) Your employees' skills undoubtedly have future economic benefit, but your company doesn't own them. (19) That's because the buyer is paying for your intangible assets, too. (20) Regardless of what you've invested in training your employees, their skills ultimately belong to them, not you. (21) Farther, accounting rules also stipulate that an asset can go on the balance sheet only if you can reliably assign an objective value to it. (22) You can't do that with your employees' skills; what they're worth to you is not an objective value. (23) In fact, because of the difficulty -- the impossibility, in many cases -- in assigning a value to intangibles, the rules prohibit companies to put any 'internally generated' intangible assets on their balance sheets.

Cam Merritt, Demand Media

Sentence 6: Financial resources also count as tangible, even though money is often just a number on a computer, it has a defined and universally agreed-upon value.

Which is the best way to write the underlined portion of this sentence? If the original is the best way, choose option (1).

A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 23 of 23


 

These practice tests are part of our GED online prep, click here to read how it works. Tips from a recent GED graduate: You don’t need to prepare for all four GED tests at the same time. Just focus on one subject area, take the test, and then move on to the next test. This approach really reduces your chances of feeling overwhelmed.

Disclaimer This practice test is not related to the Official GED Practice Test™ produced and distributed by the American Council on Education (ACE) and the GED Testing Service. ACE and GED Testing Service LLC have not approved, authorized, endorsed, been involved in the development of, or licensed the substantive content of this practice test.